Academic Catalog

2018-2019

Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 100 - Introduction to Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

A laboratory course that provides an introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Topics include the biological bases of psychological processes and behavior, sensation, perception, learning, cognition, development, social processes, personality, abnormal psychology, and possibly others. The course emphasizes current knowledge and research in the field and its application. The laboratory component of this course examines the strengths and limitations of correlational, experimental, and observational research methods, and enhances understanding of course concepts and principles. Laboratory experiences include development of research questions, design of studies, data collection in classroom laboratories and field settings, data analysis and interpretation. Laboratory assignments involve written reports and demonstration of critical thinking skills about psychological concepts and scientific research. This course has a research participation (or equivalent activity). PSYC 100 is a prerequisite for all other courses in the department.

PSYC 199 - Introductory Topics in Psychology (1-4 Credit Hours)

A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit. Please see the notes under the B.A. degree regarding Transfer Courses and PSYC 199 credit.

PSYC 200 - Research Methods and Statistics (4 Credit Hours)

This course examines the primary research methods and data analysis procedures used by psychologists to describe, predict, interpret and/or explain psychological phenomena and behavior. Observational, experimental, and quasi-experimental methods are studied along with principles of research design, control, validity, reliability, and ethical practice. Throughout the course, methodological procedures are considered in conjunction with principles and methods of data analysis, presentation, and interpretation. The logic and procedures of descriptive and inferential statistics are emphasized. This course prepares students to design, conduct, analyze and evaluate psychological research and is a prerequisite for all psychology research courses at the 200 and 300-level. To promote research ethics, all PSYC 200 students must successfully complete The National Institutes of Health's human-participant training.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 202 - Field Experience in Psychology (2 Credit Hours)

This course provides practical experience working in some area of applied psychology. Students participate in a minimum of four hours of field experience per week at human-service agencies and schools in the Granville, Newark, and Columbus areas. Students are supervised by agency staff and participate in weekly didactics and discussion at Denison, facilitated by the instructor. The purpose of the field experiences is to help students integrate and apply information from their traditional courses, to discern future career goals, to assist in personal development, and to serve the community. This course is graded S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) and may be taken a maximum of two times for a total of four credit hours with the following stipulations: 1) only two credit hours will count toward the requirement for a Psychology major or minor; 2) if taken twice, the two settings must be substantially different and approved by the instructor in advance. Students interested in taking this course must gain permission of the instructor during pre-registration.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 206 - 200-level Special Topics courses (4 Credit Hours)

The study of significant and contemporary psychological topics and perspectives at the 200 level. May be taken more than once for credit, unless otherwise noted.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100.

PSYC 210 - Development in Infancy and Childhood (4 Credit Hours)

Psychological development through late childhood and preadolescence. Topics covered include biological foundations, prenatal development, infancy, cognitive and language development, personality and social and emotional development (including attachment, development of self concept, peer relations, gender differences), family and social policy issues, and developmental psychopathology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 211 - Research in Development in Infancy and Childhood (4 Credit Hours)

Provides the student with research experience on problems of current interest in infant and child development.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and PSYC 200.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 210.

PSYC 215 - Adult Development and Aging (4 Credit Hours)

This course examines the psychological development and change in adults from young adulthood through old age. Topics include theoretical perspectives, biological and physical changes, individual differences in health and disease, memory and intellectual performance, Alzheimer's disease, personality, gender and social roles, family and intergenerational relationships, friendships, sexuality, career development and work, caregiving, and death and dying. Implications for social programs and services, public policy, and careers and education in gerontology will also be examined. Social, ethnic, historical, and cultural contexts of aging will be considered throughout the semester.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 216 - Research in Adult Development and Aging (4 Credit Hours)

Provides the student with research experience on problems of current interest in adult development.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and PSYC 200.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 215.

PSYC 220 - Social Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

The study of the nature and causes of individual behavior in social situations. Topics covered include attribution theory, social cognition, non verbal communication, attitude change, prejudice and discrimination, interpersonal attraction, prosocial behavior, aggression, and application of social psychology to the legal system.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 221 - Research in Social Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

Provides the student with research experience on problems of current interest in social psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and PSYC 200.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 220.

PSYC 225 - Environmental Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

An examination of the relationship between the environment and psychological processes. Topics examined in this course include how the character and the design of our environments can affect psychological well-being, and how certain ways in which we perceive and think can constrain our efforts to comprehend and confront environmental problems. Other topics explored are early environmental experiences and development, environmental stressors such as crowding and noise, territoriality and privacy, environmental aesthetics, cognitive maps and way-finding behavior, effects of institutional size on performance, and attitudes toward the natural environment.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

Crosslisting: ENVS 225.

PSYC 226 - Research in Environmental Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

Provides the student with experience in conducting field research. A variety of approaches are utilized, including field experiments and naturalistic observation.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and PSYC 200.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 225.

PSYC 230 - Organizational Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

This course considers the application of psychological theory and methodology to problems of organizations and the functioning of individuals and groups within organizations. Topics include team development and performance, organizational power and politics, organizational culture, leadership and motivation at work, job commitment and satisfaction, organizational change and organizational development. Required for students completing the Organizational Studies certificate.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 or consent of instructor.

PSYC 231 - Research in Organizational Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

Provides the student with research experience on problems of current interest in organizational psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and PSYC 200.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 230.

PSYC 240 - Theories of Personality (4 Credit Hours)

This course offers a systematic introduction to "normal" human personality and addresses both historical and contemporary approaches to the study of individual differences, with an emphasis on primary research and debate in the field. Within each perspective, basic theoretical assumptions, relevant research, traditional assessment methods, and current applications (i.e., to the workplace, close relationships, or health behavior) are discussed. Recurring themes regarding the structure, origin, and function of personality are explored and compared across the different perspectives.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 241 - Research in Personality Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

Provides the student with research experience addressing problems of current interest in the study of personality.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and PSYC 200.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 240.

PSYC 245 - Adolescence (4 Credit Hours)

Psychological development from late childhood through early adulthood. Topics covered include biological foundations, cognitive development, personality and social and emotional development (including development of self concept, family and peer relations, gender differences, and sexuality), culture, ethnicity and social policy issues, and developmental psychopathology in adolescence.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 246 - Research in Adolescence (4 Credit Hours)

Provides the student with research experience on problems of current interest in adolescent development.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and PSYC 200.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 245.

PSYC 250 - Abnormal Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

This course provides an introduction to the scientific study of psychopathology. We will consider contemporary approaches to defining abnormal behavior and the current diagnostic system: DSM-5. For each disorder, we will examine its essential features, associated characteristics, prevalence, course, and etiology. We will also examine both pharmacological and psychosocial treatments for each disorder. This course is especially designed for students interested in clinical/counseling psychology, psychiatry, social work, neuropsychology, or other helping professions.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 251 - Research in Abnormal Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

Provides the student with research experience on problems of relevance to abnormal psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and PSYC 200.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 250.

PSYC 260 - Human Sexuality (4 Credit Hours)

A survey of psychological and biological aspects of sexuality. Topics include prenatal sexual differentiation, sexual anatomy, physiology of sexual response, contraceptive behavior, sexually transmissible infections, sexual dysfunction, and cancer and other diseases of the reproductive system.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

Crosslisting: QS 260.

PSYC 265 - Cultural Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

This course is a survey of theory, methods, and research in culture and psychology. This course examines the ways in which culture shapes psychological and physiological functioning, and the cyclical nature of that relationship. The course will also draw from other areas such as anthropology, sociology, history, and biology to give a holistic overview of the dynamic and non-essentialist nature of culture. Special emphasis will be placed on topics such as health disparities, internalized stigma, race and ethnicity, and immigration. Critically, this course will emphasize the use of an intersectional (interacting social identities) perspective in the study of culture, with specific considerations of gender, sexuality, age, and ability status.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 266 - Research in Cultural Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

Provides the student with research experience on problems of relevance to cultural psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and PSYC 200.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 265.

PSYC 270 - Health Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

The field of health psychology investigates the relationship between health, mental processes and behavior. This course considers the role of health habits in the development of disease and the impact of psychological factors on the course of disease. In addition, the course explores the ways in which psychological principles can aid in the development of both individual and medical interventions to prevent disease and promote health. Topics include: stress, immunity, the management of chronic illness, and the contribution of psychological and social factors to cancer, cardiovascular disease, AIDS, and autoimmune diseases. In addition, health enhancing and health compromising behaviors such as exercise, diet, and smoking will be examined. Social, historical and cultural factors associated with health will also be considered in this course.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 271 - Research in Health Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

This course provides the student with research experience on problems of current interest in health psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and PSYC 200.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 270.

PSYC 280 - Psychology of Diversity (4 Credit Hours)

This course will introduce students to issues that characterize diverse societies and will present analyses of these issues from a psychological perspective. We will learn how social categories, such as race, social class, religion, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc. inform individuals’ identities, the way they make sense of their social world, and the way they act in it. The social hierarchies and power inequalities between different groups that characterize the U.S. and many other societies in the world will be at the heart of our analysis. We will read theory and research on social identities, origins and functions of prejudice and stereotyping, their effects on the targeted populations and on ways of reducing prejudice, improving intergroup relations as well as redressing inequality. This course fulfills the Power of Justice (P) GE requirement.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 290 - Psychology of Thinking (4 Credit Hours)

This course provides an introduction to the study of higher order cognition. The course will focus on reasoning, decision making, problem solving, creativity, and related issues. In class, we will consider current theories of cognition, explore the methodologies used to study higher order cognition, and uncover how these issues relate to our own thinking. We will also use this inquiry to examine and develop our critical thinking skills.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 291 - Research in Psyc of Thinking (4 Credit Hours)

This class provides students with research experience focusing on issues relevant to thinking and reasoning. Students engage in multiple empirical studies during the course of the semester, learning about the application of descriptive, correlational, and simple experimental methods.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and PSYC 200.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 290.

PSYC 299 - Intermediate Topics in Psychology (1-4 Credit Hours)

A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.

PSYC 300 - Seminars (4 Credit Hours)

Seminars are designed for majors in special areas within Psychology. Content will vary with staff and student interest. Typically, seminars include lecture/discussion and student presentations.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199, PSYC 200, one 200-level research course combination and junior or senior status.

PSYC 301 - Seminar: Psychology of Women (4 Credit Hours)

This course reviews psychological research and theories on women. Topics include sex bias in psychological research, gender differences and similarities in personality and abilities, lifespan development, problems of adjustment and psychotherapy, language and communication, women's health, female sexuality, and violence against women (rape and wife battering).

Prerequisite(s): WGST major, or PSYC 100 or PSYC 199, PSYC 200, and junior or senior status, or consent.

Crosslisting: WGST 301.

PSYC 305 - Psychopharmacology (4 Credit Hours)

This course begins with an overview of the ways in which psychoactive drugs work, including discussions of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, neuronal function, neurotransmitters, dose-response functions, tolerance and sensitization and toxicity. Agonistic and antagonistic drug effects are then studied, including the specific ways in which neurotransmitters may be affected by such actions. In the second half of the course, specific drugs used in the treatment of psychological disorders are studied, including drugs to treat anxiety disorders, clinical depression and schizophrenia. Finally, "recreational" drug use is examined, including discussions of alcohol and marijuana. Issues of drugs, culture, and behavior are emphasized throughout the semester.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and/or BIOL 220, or permission of instructor.

PSYC 306 - 300-level Special Topics courses (4 Credit Hours)

The study of significant and contemporary psychological topics and perspectives at the 300 level. May be taken more than once for credit, unless otherwise noted.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 310 - Psychology of Learning (4 Credit Hours)

An intensive survey of experimental research on fundamental emotional-cognitive processes of learning and memory, with a focus on how those processes manifest themselves in, influence, and determine behavior. The learning processes of instrumental and Pavlovian conditioning, and the interactions of those learning processes, comprise the main focus of the course. Theory, research, implications and applications pertaining to the basic principles of behavior are emphasized. The course, and learning/conditioning research traditionally, is valuable because of the use of models to understand learning about biologically and emotionally-significant experiences. Unconscious learning and seemingly irrational reactions are considered in depth. Much of the course content is relevant to applied topics such as behavior modification, substance abuse problems, anxiety, depression, other behavior disorders, education and parenting practices. This course does not cover techniques for improving academic learning skills for students.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 311 - Research in Psychology of Learning (4 Credit Hours)

Offers the student experience conducting research in and/or out of the learning laboratory, using a variety of methods. Research requires time outside of class. Some work with live animals is usually involved. This course fulfills a Writing Competency (W) GE requirement.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199, PSYC 200, and one 200-level research course combination.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 310.

PSYC 315 - Development of Children with Special Needs (4 Credit Hours)

Disability is a facet of human diversity that is often overlooked. This course explores a wide range of developmental disabilities, focusing mostly on physical impairments and intellectual disabilities. We will discuss the impact of disabilities on the individual's development and how families respond to the various challenges that often arise. In addition, we will review some general concepts concerning disabilities, including prenatal development and testing, ethical issues, cultural influences, relevant public policy including federal and state laws and regulations, early intervention, and the family-centered approach. Some of the disabilities that will be examined include metabolic errors, disorders of hearing and communication, neural tube defects, intellectual disabilities, specific learning disabilities, Fragile X, ADHD, and disorders on the Autism Spectrum. This course fulfills the Power and Justice (P) GE requirement.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 320 - Culture and Human Development (4 Credit Hours)

Cultural psychology is an examination of the influence of cultural processes on a wide range of psychological topics, including perceiving, thinking, child development, language, and social cognition. Its unifying theme is the claim that complex psychological phenomena need to be understood as being situated in a cultural context. Some broad topics considered in the course are the nature of human nature, the psychological properties of tools and technology, and research methods for the study of cultural psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 330 - Cognitive Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

This course examines how people acquire, remember, and use knowledge. Topics covered include memory, attention, perception, imagery, and cognitive neuroscience. Applications to contexts such as learning and teaching, social behaviors, and individual behavior and performance will be considered.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 331 - Research in Cognitive Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

Provides the student with research experience on problems of current interest in cognitive psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199, PSYC 200, and one 200-level research course combination.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 330.

PSYC 340 - Sensation and Perception (4 Credit Hours)

This course explores sensory and perceptual systems. Discussions on these topics will reflect biological, ecological and evolutionary perspectives. Topics include sensitivity to light and sound; color perception; depth and form perception; perceptual illusions; music perception, and speech perception. Power and justice issues associated with sensory disabilities (e.g., blindness and deafness) will be emphasized. This course fulfills the Power and Justice (P) GE requirement.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 341 - Research in Sensation and Perception (4 Credit Hours)

This course offers experience in conducting research on sensory processes and perception. Students are exposed to different research techniques and investigate problems relating to the various sensory modalities. This course fulfills a Writing Competency (W) GE requirement.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199, PSYC 200, and one 200-level research course combination.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 350.

PSYC 350 - Biological Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

This course explores the relationships between the brain and nervous system and behavior, and includes topics ranging from neuroanatomy and pharmacology of the nervous system to the biological bases of mental illness. The interactions among the nervous and endocrine systems are emphasized in an attempt to understand how basic physiological principles can serve in the understanding of complex phenomena, including emotion, learning, sleep and arousal and sexual behavior. Required for students pursuing the neuroscience concentration.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 351 - Research in Biological Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

This course focuses on basic research methodologies and techniques that are commonly used to examine the biological bases of behavior. Students are given "hands on" experience in the design and execution of several research projects. This course fulfills a Writing Competency (W) GE requirement.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199, PSYC 200, and one 200-level research course combination.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 350.

PSYC 355 - Clinical Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

This course introduces students to the discipline of clinical psychology from the scientist-practitioner perspective. Topics include psychological assessment, diagnostic interviewing, and evidence-basedpsychotherapies. We will also examine the efficacy and effectiveness of psychosocial treatments for mental disorders, professional ethics, and recent developments in the field of clinical/counseling psychology.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199.

PSYC 356 - Research in Clinical Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

This course provides students with experience conducting empirical research related to the field of clinical psychology. This course fulfills a Writing Competency (W) GE requirement.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199, PSYC 200, and one 200-level research course combination.

Corequisite(s): PSYC 355.

PSYC 361 - Directed Study (1-4 Credit Hours)

PSYC 362 - Directed Study (1-4 Credit Hours)

PSYC 363 - Independent Study (1-4 Credit Hours)

PSYC 364 - Independent Study (1-4 Credit Hours)

PSYC 370 - Advanced Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences (4 Credit Hours)

An introduction to techniques of data analysis, interpretation, and presentation. Special emphasis is placed on sampling theory, tests of significance, analysis of variance, regression and using SPSS for analysis. Cannot be taken for credit by students who have already taken both MATH 220 (formerly MATH 242) and PSYC 200. Cannot be taken concurrently with MATH 120 (formerly MATH 102.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199 and PSYC 200.

PSYC 399 - Advanced Topics in Psychology (1-4 Credit Hours)

A general category used only in the evaluation of transfer credit.

PSYC 410 - History and Systems of Psychology (4 Credit Hours)

This course examines major issues in psychology as they have been addressed throughout its history, from the writings of the Greek philosophers to 20th and 21st century theories and experimental investigations. These issues include mind-body relations; processes of knowledge acquisition such as perception and learning; nature and nurture; the nature of mind and consciousness; characteristics of human motivation and personality; and the nature of thought and memory. The philosophy of scientific inquiry in relation to the field of psychology is also considered. Many issues considered connect to the current states of modern psychology. The course is a unifying experience for psychology majors.

Prerequisite(s): PSYC 100 or PSYC 199, junior or senior status or consent.

PSYC 451 - Senior Research (4 Credit Hours)

Senior research is not required for the Psychology major. It is a two-semester experience; for those who choose to conduct senior research, the work must be conducted during Fall (451) and Spring (452) semesters of the senior year. Students considering senior research should consult with their academic advisor and other Psychology faculty regarding feasibility well before the start of the senior year. PSYC 451 must be taken after, or be taken concurrently with, PSYC 370. 4 credits each semester.

PSYC 452 - Senior Research (4 Credit Hours)

Must have taken or be taken concurrently with Psychology 370.